Little Known Political Figure Prince Giorgio Carbone Dies at 73

Little Known Political Figure Prince Giorgio Carbone Dies at 73

In the world of movers and shakers where politics are played out as large as life, there are a few lesser known figures on the political stage who may not carry the grandiose power and international prestige as other world leaders but who are none the less, inspirational and influential in their own right. Giorgio Carbone, also known as the Prince of Seborga, was such a man.

Once the head of a flower grower's co-op in the small Italian town of Seborga, Giorgio Carbone began to rally the locals behind the dream of independence when, after much research into the history of the town of Seborga, he convinced many that the city itself had a strong case for independence and to declare the city as the Principality of Seborga. The basis for his claims of independents stemmed from the fact that Italian authorities had failed to include the city in the official description of Italian territories upon two different occasions. Once in 1861 in the acts that unified Italy and then once again years later during the declaration and establishment of the Italian republic in 1946. So, reasoned Carbone, since Seborga had not been mentioned either time and was not formally by these documents, claimed as a part of the nation of Italy, Seborga had a legal claim to its independence.

So moved by Carbone's arguments were the locals that in 1963 they elected Carbone as the Prince of Seborga by a land slide vote of 304 to 4. He accepted this title and the burden that it carried and he promptly declared Seborga an independent city state. He strove for international recognition during his reign and made commendable headway. While the Italian government mostly dismissed Carbone's claims as a harmless attempt to bolster local tourism to the small town, some referred to The Principality of Seborga as a micronation, some as a secessionist movement. Others in the political realm were quite impressed by his accomplishments and he has encouraged other micronations and independence movements around the globe including The Socialist Kingdom of Zandrovia and others who hope to one day create a small independent community. He stood as a wonderful reminder that politics is not all about scandal and corruption, but sometimes it is about simple people with simple dreams that become a noble legacy.

Carbone died at the age of 73 on November 25, 2009. There will be an official memorial service held for him as a Solemn Mass in by the officials and citizens of Seborga at the Church of Saint Bernard on December 5, 2009 at 11 am to honor the life of Giorgio Carbone and his vision of independence. As he left no heir to replace him, government officials in Seborga are expected to convene to discuss the choice for a new Prince to secure that Carbone's work continues and that the Principality of Seborga lives on. His Tremendousness as he was called by local villagers, shall be missed by many but his dream and the dreams that he has inspired in so many others shall live on.